Majority of Japanese millennials believe in lifetime employment

Research from the Japan Institute for Labour Policy has found that the majority of Japanese millennials believe in staying at their companies long-term, Bloomberg reported. 

In a survey conducted by the organization, 55 percent of workers in their 20s said that they agreed with the concept of spending their whole lives at a single company. In 2004, just 34 percent of Japanese millennials believed in that idea. 

Masato Gunji, assistant director of the institute's research department, related this penchant for lifetime employment to several decades of economic turbulence and instability. 

"Since they were born, they've only experienced bad economic conditions," Gunji said in an interview with Bloomberg. "Even if the economy is now recovering, it's a recovery they aren't actually feeling."

These findings come as Japanese employers consider raising the retirement age for their workers, according to Reuters. A survey conducted by the news agency found that the large majority of Nipponese companies currently have a mandated retirement age of 60, but 60 percent of organizations intend to raise the age, with 46 percent aiming to bump it up to 65. 

In a survey conducted by the institute, 55 percent of workers in their 20s said that they agreed with the concept of spending their whole lives at a single company.