New data shows strong job creation in Ireland since 2012

Not unlike the U.S. and many of the world's major powers, Ireland suffered significantly in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Also, within its own borders, the "Celtic Tiger" period of economic growth that was too large to be sustainable wreaked additional havoc on the Irish economy. Signs of recovery began surfacing near the end of 2012, and things slowly but surely got better for the Republic, to the point where some fear more boom-and-bust on the horizon.

However, hard data backs up these hopes for renewed Irish prosperity. Citing information recently released by the nation's Central Statistics Office, The Irish Times reported that Ireland's economy saw nearly 377,000 jobs created since the second quarter of 2012, precisely when the financial crash's aftermath started to fade away. Many of these jobs - 374,000 of them, in fact - were full time, which shows even more promise. All told, the job growth between Q2 2012 and November 2018 represents a 20 percent uptick, and at the same time, unemployment fell from a staggering 16 per cent rate in the thick of the recession to a much more manageable 2018 rate of 5 per cent. 

The considerable infusion of tech and finance industry growth that Ireland has seen in recent years represents a major share of the nation's job growth, represented in the CSO data as upswings in the "professional" and "skilled trades" segments. Respectively, these groups created 72,000 and 41,900 jobs. That said, nearly all sectors of the Irish economy grew to some degree during these past six years, with only the agriculture, forestry and fishing sector seeing a small decline of 5,100 positions. 

The Republic of Ireland is also in the position of seeing none of the adverse effects from Brexit that its U.K.-overseen neighbor, Northern Ireland, is poised to potentially experience. Merchants in the North, according to BBC News, are, at best, cautiously optimistic about the prospects of shipping their goods to the rest of Europe and beyond when Brexit goes into full effect. 

New data shows strong job creation in Ireland since 2012